Power Authority

Power & Authority

Power and Authority

I first heard about these concepts during some training I did way back in the good old days.

Power Authority

I was studying to move from a classroom teacher to become a headmaster. (I didn't finish – I stayed in the classroom.)

For those of who who haven’t heard of this before, it means that the one person who controls an outcome in almost all cases in almost any situation, will be the one with the most power or most perceived power, even if they do not have the authority to make any real decisions.

“How does this happen?” I hear you ask.

It is actually very simple, and when you know, you’ll think, “How did I not understand this?”

An example from my own life.

Power V’s Authority In Sales

As a salesperson I often made ‘cold’ calls to companies to sell them advertising. Sometimes I knew the name of the decision maker. Sometimes not. More often not, I’m afraid. But that’s another story. For another time.

I asked for the the media buyer, or whomsoever had the AUTHORITY to make a decision to buy my bill of goods.

All good. Just a breath away from an appt. Then my superior skills as a salesman would kick in and I’d get me a sale. Fantastic.

Not so quick. I was asking to speak to the decision maker – the one having the authority, but I wasn’t there yet. The Receptionist or Personal Assistant or Secretary was sitting there in front of me with an inscrutable smile on his or her face.

It dawned on me. This person will DECIDE if I see the authority figure. Or not.

Yes or No

If I received a yes then Thunderbirds are go. Appt made.

If I received a no, an excuse, a brush-off, an “I think he’s busy that time/day,” kind of thing – I was left hanging. Who was this person in front of me? No matter what I said, how I pleaded, cajoled, explained that the authority would make the decision, I was very often stymied right there. At the reception desk.

The seat of power.

You see if I couldn’t get an appointment to see the authority figure because the one person with the power to make that happen was a massive roadblock, I was stuck right there.

OK. No authority to make decisions EXCEPT the only one I needed at that point – an audience with the boss or whoever. It didn’t matter. If I was stuck at the front desk it was ‘game-over.’

The one with the power is always going to be the barrier to any further interaction. No matter what.

May Not Be Who You Expect

And this is often one of the least likely people. Someone quite low on the company pecking order. Someone who was making these judgement calls based on incorrect or incomplete knowledge of the company, the processes, or the person involved. Or even personal or other emotional – non business reasons. (For example there may be a belief that I was untrustworthy, or had been inappropriate in some way, or ‘the Boss’ needed protection from my type -ie salesmen). He/she may just not like me. Anything really. Makes no difference if the decision to grant an appointment was based on anything real; it was still the decision that counted.

All the power. No authority, but I couldn't move forward past this obstacle.

Current World

I think we need to know this in our current world more than ever. Are we interacting with the right person? Social media gives us an opportunity to lambaste anyone. Free speech at its finest. But first we need to establish whether we we aiming our comments at the right person or organisation. We may be a victim of a power game.

Chicken Soup

Where is the power in any situation in which you find yourself? There is a really interesting story in “Jack Cranfield’s - Chicken Soup For The Soul” that illustrates this very point.

Think About This

Make it a factor in your thoughts and actions from now on.

Who has the power in this situation?

Have you had any experiences in this kind of thing you can share with us?

Off you go. Over to you.

Socrates Paradox

Know What I Know

Know what I know.

The other day I was talking to my optometrist – a young woman by my standards, I’ll not attempt to guess her age to avoid embarrassment. But it was less than half mine.

I have thought about this issue before, possibly even written about it, but here it is popping up again.

New Glasses

I was ordering my NEW glasses. I seem to remember early on in our discussion (some weeks ago) that the time frame for the generation of these new lenses and placing them in my frames would be about a month and I would have to wear on older pair until then.

While that was not the end of the world it was a long time to contemplate using an even more outdated prescription. My eyes were already sore, puffy, leaky, bloodshot and having a higher pressure (glaucoma) than was optimal.

How Long?

However this time when the order was placed, I noticed that I did not ask about the time frame. This is not to point out how clever I am, but just to note how priorities and expectations have changed as I have reached these higher strata in the age department.

I didn’t ask ‘cause it didn’t matter anymore. I had made a decision to get new spectacles. It will take as long as it takes. I can’t do anything about it, so why worry? Using an older pair was part of that decision. I am unable to fix this. It is what it is and I might have made a different decision if urgency was an issue.

Many younger people cannot come to terms with the prayer we all attribute to alcoholics anonymous. It was written much earlier than that organisation’s use of it – but that is not important right now. You understand this as you get older. Know what I know.

The serenity Prayer

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.”

There is so much stuff we know as older people that is so frustrating to us, when we see younger people make the same mistakes we made 30-40 years ago.

Now I understand the learning process (I was a teacher for many years) and we learn and remember more by doing than any other way, and if we are to make mistakes the learning is often that much sharper. This adds to my frustration. I need to be able to accept that mistakes MUST happen and if I were able to stop them all – this might well be counter-productive.

Peer Pressure

But I wish I could, at least, make these youngsters aware that there might be another way

My daughter often uses peer information to make decisions that her mother and I know were not what we believed. And our daughter is a pretty fine woman, so we must have done something right. Peer pressure wins. Again.

Know What I Know

Sometimes it’s not time or money or anything physical. Sometimes it’s guilt and more often regret.

I KNow

“I wish I’d done that differently.” is a common response to a ‘not completely satisfactory end game.’ “I tried to tell you.” is our older person’s refrain. That doesn’t help. Only makes the situation worse.

I don’t think schools help. How to multiply 2*2 might not matter in the time of the calculator, but that, and say, “What’s the Capital of France?” might be nice to knows, and might suggest a higher intelligence – doubtful but impressions count, and MIGHT save time if a question is asked. (ie you don’t have to look it up- it is available from the RAM (Random Access Memory) in your head. But as well as all that factual stuff schools, in my opinion, should teach self-help, personal development, and all that supposedly esoteric stuff. Along with standards like balancing a budget. Cooking. Basic life skills.

(Cliche alert) The ability to think outside the box does not appear to be prioritised; yet we all know - NOTHING in life is ever able to be categorised completely. There is always something different.

And we are not often taught to think at all. And just rote learning is not enough. Important in many cases, but not enough.

That is why our (older) knowledge is really cool. It is based on life skills. Living. It doesn’t rely on a TEACHER as such.

Teacher Appears

Although, there is a saying, alternately attributed to Buddha Siddhartha Guatama Shakyamuni and the Theosophists, that goes: “When the student is ready, the teacher will appear.”

This applies more than ever nowadays, I reckon.

Know what I know.

HaHaHa.

Reminds me of a couple of songs I know.

In the middle of a ‘Hey Gringo’ song the and lyrics replying to an audience heckle, “Play something we know.” – the band leader replies, “Know something we play.”

And Rick Nelson, in a song called, ‘Garden Party.’ says, “… if memories were all I played, I’d rather drive a truck.”

Learning, (moving forward with new knowledge) is the key to a better way of life.

Isn’t it?

We Need To Talk About Loneliness

Need  To Talk About Loneliness.

Loneliness is …

A book I read a few years ago started with the words, “We need to talk about Kevin.”

Loneliness Collage

Well, we need to talk about loneliness.

  • What is it?
  • How does it affect us as human beings?
  • Can you be lonely in a room full of people?
  • Can you fix/mitigate it?
  • Loneliness and social media
  • Loneliness and the smart phone
  • Loneliness is better than bad company

The list can go on and on. We will be extending it as we move forward with our discussion of this topic over the next few weeks and months.

There is a lot to be said.

A Listing Of 10 books (Self-help) on Loneliness:

These books were chosen as the top ten based on sales, bestseller rankings, and positive reader reviews on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Goodreads.

https://www.onlinepsychologydegree.info/top-10-self-help-books-about-loneliness/

Join our group.

Loneliness Is … https://www.facebook.com/groups/loneliness.is/

Loneliness Australia

Loneliness In Australia

Loneliness In Australia

Numbers - Stats:

Let’s start with a few numbers and some bits and pieces culled from around the web shall we? This part is not my own work (I will tell you where it comes from if I know) but it is germaine to the whole topic.

We need to know the facts, as far as we are able to ascertain them, before we can do much that is intelligent, don’t we?

There is one school of thought that says there is very little difference between genders in this state of affairs and since that makes things a whole lot easier. we’ll go with that. OK?

There is a difference in age groups though. See below info from VicHealth below, the State Health Authority from Victoria, Australia. I am going with our older group here, the over 75’s. Some of the stats tell us that over 65’s until this 75 age group have less problem with loneliness than all other groups, but that might be for another time.

I am not going to pull out the stats but refer you to the attached document which does a pretty good job of telling you the facts and all the facts. Too many for me to discuss in detail.

Australian Psychological Society (APS) Swinburne University of Technology.

This covers in great detail everything you needed to know but were afraid to ask.

Except, perhaps, something that surprised me. Those amongst us of high IQ (more than 150-160 say, not me, I’m afraid) are more prone to being lonely than those with lower numbers, because they find it difficult to communicate with those of lesser intellect than themselves. They become kind of social outcasts. Interesting?

Neil Howe of Forbes Magazine has this to say:

The scourge of loneliness is an issue that we’re going to hear ever-more about in the years to come.

The Economist/KFF findings add to a wave of recent research showing high levels of loneliness. A recent Cigna survey revealed that nearly half of Americans always or sometimes feel alone (46%) or left out (47%). Fully 54% said they always or sometimes feel that no one knows them well. Loneliness isn’t just a U.S. phenomenon. In a nationwide survey released in October from the BBC, a third of Britons said that they often or very often feel lonely. Nearly half of Britons over 65 consider the television or a pet their main source of company. In Japan, there are more than half a million people under 40 who haven’t left their house or interacted with anyone for at least six months. In Canada, the share of solo households is now 28%. Across at the European Union, it’s 34%.

Have a look at the attached doc and then at these excerpts from VicHealth.

Vichealth.Vic.Gov.Au Loneliness:

A New Public Health Challenge Emerges – Some Excerpts for Your Perusal:

Loneliness can affect people at any point, but is more common among two key groups: older individuals aged 75 and above and, perhaps surprisingly, young people aged 15–25.

Figures released in April 2018 by the UK’s Office for National Statistics showed individuals aged 16–24 reported feeling lonely more often than people in older age groups. The statistics also identified a particular risk of loneliness among young people who were renting and who did not feel a sense of belonging to the local area.

Although research in Australia is currently limited, a 2015 survey funded by VicHealth found one in eight young people aged 16–25 reported a very high intensity of loneliness.

Why Do They Say They Are Lonely

Social loneliness refers to the absence of a social network made up of a wide group of friends, neighbours and colleagues.

The quality of those social connections is also important. Relationships need to be reciprocal, with those involved both sharing a sense of happiness, satisfaction and self-worth. (In 2012, a team at the University of California published the results of a study that found significant numbers of older people who identified as lonely were either married or lived with others.)

What Does Loneliness Mean?

Loneliness is commonly understood as an emotional response to the perceived mismatch between the amount of personal contact a person wants and the amount they have.

Men’s Sheds

A well-known community initiative that tackles social isolation is the Australian Men’s Shed Association. Its CEO David Helmers says, with a little humour, ‘There are currently 130-odd more Men’s Sheds [987 Sheds] in Australia than there are McDonald’s restaurants. Not that it’s a race.’

The Sheds target men who are no longer in paid employment, through retirement, redundancy or other reasons. Men can come to the Shed to build and repair items for the community, but that’s not the place’s main purpose.

The most important thing is the men getting together, building those relationships, that brotherhood that exists in the Sheds. They’re finding new friendships but, most importantly, finding meaningful purpose,’ says Helmers.

Most Effective Way To Reduce Loneliness:

The most effective way to reduce loneliness is to make people feel connected to their community,’. ‘Those communities may not be geographic – for example, they may be online for LGBTI youth or rural young people – but what’s important is they share common interests and develop meaningful connections.’

Holt-Lunstad suggests interventions ranging from a bigger focus on social skills training in schools, to making social connectedness checks part of standard medical screenings. Human Resources departments could prepare workers for retirement socially as well as financially, she says.

Planning out suburbs so they are walk-able and include social spaces where people can meet up, such as gardens or recreation centres, is also crucial. Media campaigns could raise awareness about loneliness while also removing some of the label’s stigma.

Public Health England, in its 2015 Reducing social isolation across the lifecourse report, highlighted that ‘access to transport is also vitally important for building and maintaining social connections’.

Affects of loneliness

There is robust evidence that social isolation and loneliness significantly increase risk for premature mortality, and the magnitude of the risk exceeds that of many leading health indicators,’ Holt-Lunstad told the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association in August 2017, adding, ‘Many nations around the world now suggest we are facing a ‘loneliness epidemic’. The challenge we face is what can be done about it.’

Holt-Lunstad drew on data from two meta-analyses for her presentation. The first found greater social connection conferred a 50 per cent reduced risk of early death. The second examined 70 studies and concluded that social isolation, loneliness or living alone posed risks for premature death that were as big as or bigger than obesity, smoking (less than 15 cigarettes a day) and air pollution.

We know that the impacts of feeling lonely and isolated impede your health, whether that’s your mental health or physical health,’ says Irene Verins, Manager, Mental Well-being at VicHealth. ‘We need to identify the factors that influence loneliness – at the level of the individual, the local community and wider society – to get some idea, or a clue, as to where to look for solutions.

The Health Consequences of Loneliness -Causes and Health Consequences of Feeling Lonely By Kendra Cherry

Loneliness has a wide range of negative effects on both physical and mental health, including:

Depression and suicide

Cardiovascular disease and stroke

Increased stress levels

Decreased memory and learning

Antisocial behaviour

Poor decision-making

Alcoholism and drug abuse

The progression of Alzheimer's disease

Altered brain function

Loneliness can be overcome. It does require a conscious effort on your part to make a change. Making a change, in the long run, can make you happier, healthier, and enable you to impact others around you in a positive way.

Here are some ways Kendra Cherry suggests we can prevent loneliness:

  • Recognise that loneliness is a sign that something needs to change.
  • Understand the effects that loneliness has on your life, both physically and mentally.
  • Consider doing community service or another activity that you enjoy. These situations present great opportunities to meet people and cultivate new friendships and social interactions.
  • Focus on developing quality relationships with people who share similar attitudes, interests, and values with you.
  • Expect the best. Lonely people often expect rejection, so instead focus on positive thoughts and attitudes in your social relationships

Loneliness and social isolation are important health risks in the elderly Uni Crest

Living alone, health problems and disability, sensory impairment such as hearing loss, and major life events such as loss of a spouse have all been identified as risk factors for social isolation and loneliness.

Some Suggestions for Solutions

If you're not sure how to help someone who is lonely, here are some tips on how to support someone who is experiencing feelings of loneliness. (From British Telecom – Press Association)

  1. Show them you’re available

Keep in touch by phone, email or in person so they know someone is there for them when they need support. Don’t give up on them if they don’t call or visit you in return, but if they need time alone, try to respect that.

  1. Offer to take them out

If it’s difficult for them to get out and about, you could volunteer to take them out, for example to a café or to visit a friend. There might even be a local charity who could help if you don’t have much spare time. Just don’t push them into anything, as it might seem daunting to them at first.

  1. Ask how they’re feeling

By talking to them about how they’re feeling, without leading them into any particular issue, you might find out that something else is troubling them. Try not to make assumptions about why they are lonely – there are many reasons why someone might be feeling loneliness.

  1. Enlist expert help

Some people might feel more comfortable talking about their feelings to a stranger or professional. If it seems appropriate, you could suggest they speak to their GP or call a charity helpline.

  1. Be dependable

Missing a visit or phone call may not seem important to you, but could be very disappointing for someone who doesn’t have much contact with others, so try to be reliable.

  1. Help them discover new ways to stay in touch

There are a huge range of different ways to stay in touch these days, from social media to email and text messaging. If they don’t feel comfortable using computers, you could encourage them to join a course to learn how to use computers and the internet, which are run by most local councils.

  1. Help them to try something new

If they have a particular interest, joining a group, such as a rambling club, reading group or dance class, could help them connect with like-minded people. If they show an interest in an activity, you could offer to go with them to the first session if they’re nervous about going alone.

  1. Talk about practical barriers

Barriers such as not having a car, not having enough money or being a full-time carer could be preventing them from connecting with people or getting out and about. Talk to them about what these barriers may be and encourage them to speak to someone.

  1. Ask other people for help

If you’re very busy or live far away, you don’t need to feel like you have to do everything yourself. See if anyone else, such as a friend, neighbour, relative or charity volunteer, can regularly call or visit the person who is lonely.

  1. Host a Sunday lunch

Summary

Let’s leave it at that for this time shall we? We’ve had a bit of a look at the stats, and what loneliness means. Added to that we have had a very quick look at the mental and physical health effects of loneliness, and some ways to mitigate this whole loneliness thing. And finally some solutions.

We’ll pick up on each of these as we move forward. There is so much to say.

One of the thoughts that comes up in my mind is ‘what do lonely people do all day?’

We should have a look at that in a little while.

If any-one has any input, comment let’s hear it. Are you lonely as distinct from being alone?

How much of you day/week/month would you say you are lonely, and what do YOU do when you are in these lonely patches? Talk soon.

Braving Change – Colin Rochford

Braving Change - Colin Rochford

Reviewed By: Mamta Madhavan

5 Stars

Review Rating: 5 Stars - Congratulations on your 5-star review!


Reviewed for Readers’ Favorite

Change is constant

Change is constant but there are many people out there who feel intimidated by change and find it difficult to accept change.

Braving Change: 5 Steps to Overcoming your Fear of Change and Facing Life with Joy (Change Series Book 1) by Colin Rochford gives an insightful view of the concept of change and gives confidence to readers to accept change instead of resisting it. The author delves deep into the concept of change and speaks about overcoming the fear of change, understanding the fear of change, what can be done, and how to move forward with a different outlook. It is a good book to help readers realize that the concept of change is not new and there is no need to be afraid of it.

Methodical

The author tackles a relevant subject methodically and practically, making it easy for readers to connect with his words as they navigate and welcome the changes in their lives. The book will give readers a way of understanding why change happens and will also tell them how often 'bad' changes can also have silver linings. It is definitely a good book to help one look at change with a new outlook and welcome it with an open mind.

Five Steps

The 5 steps to overcoming the fear of change are helpful when it comes to making change easier to accept. The author's style is simple and neat, honest and straightforward, making it easy for readers to understand and apply the advice in their lives. I am sure, like me, that readers out there must be waiting for Book 2.

Fear of Change eBook

Eat That Frog Brian Tracy

Eat That Frog – Brian Tracy

A short book in the procrastination genre. Not to be missed.

One thing I notice as I read the many self-help books available out there is the fact that they are all as special as the people reading them.

Resonate

Some resonate immediately and qualify for the “Changed My Life” comment. Some you need to read again and again.

And some hit a note that you are absolutely sure you have heard/read before, but never seemed to quite hook onto.

Hook

This book was the hook for me. So simple, straightforward and beautifully crafted. Hardly a wasted word. He does repeat “Eat That Frog” a few times, but that was necessary. Well, it was for me.

You just need to keep right on reading each new book until one smacks you in the forehead as this one did for me.

OMG. Yeah. Now I get it. Why did I put it off for so long?

CANI

Then keep right on reading – because why would you want to stop learning? Continuous and Never-ending Improvement.

Thanks, Eat That FrogBrian. I get it now.

 

 

 

 

Change and The Miracle Morning

The Miracle Morning & Change.

Change is on the horizon.

What if?

What if you could miraculously wake up tomorrow and any - or every area of your life was transformed? Notice the diffences. What wouldThe Miracle Morning have changed? Would you be happier? Healthier? More successful? In better shape? Would you have more energy? Less Stress? More Money? Better relationships? Which of your problems would be solved? What if I told you that there is a "not-so-obvious" secret that is guaranteed to transform any - or literally every area of your life, faster than you ever thought possible?

Enter ‘The Miracle Morning’, by Hal Elrod. What's now being practised by thousands of people around the world could perhaps be the simplest approach to creating the life you've always wanted. It's been right there in front of us, Are you ready? The next chapter of your life - the most extraordinary life you've ever imagined - is about to begin. You deserve an extraordinary life. It's time to wake up to your full potential. Change your life for the better.

Review

My full review of this wonderful book will follow in a later post.

But let me tell you about how it is working for me. Hal Elrod sets up a series of activities one needs to do for an hour each morning under the acronym savers.

SAVERS

I have been pursuing this technique for nearly two months now.

Following what is written in the book, I get up, mostly when the alarm goes off; pop into the bathroom, wash my face, brush my teeth, comb my hair, rinse my mouth with mouthwash - all things which were in the book and then begin my one hour (the 6 * 10 mins) SAVERS morning routine.

Silence

It starts with 10 minutes of Silence. I sit concentrating on my breathing - breathing in breathing out. Then I apply the yoga method of alternate nostril breathing which is possible. Hard but possible. I breathe in one nostril out the other, in and out I make lots of funny faces doing it but there's no one here to watch me. It takes a LOT of concentration. But that is actually the point. As the conscious mind can only handle one thing at a time, the level of effort required to practise this breathing technique eschews the brain’s ability to think other thoughts. There’s your silence right there. More about this below.

Inner Self

After this, I begin the practice of getting in touch with my inner-self. Interestingly, I notice my face seems to feel different each side. Dunno why. Perhaps I am a two-faced son-of-a-bitch. Then I concentrate on listening. I imagine a funnel, a large one, in my ear bringing all the sounds from outside and around me into that ear. After some time I visualise the same on the other side.

Body Scan

Then I do the practice in meditation they call the 'body scan'. I start with the top of my head and make like I'm relaxing everything about my body dropping down to a different part, eyelids, face, mouth, jaw, neck, shoulders, arms all the way down to my toes. Many times during this thoughts and ideas from all parts of my life push into my brain. I allow them for a short time until I realise what is happening and then shut them out by concentrating on breathing again. Repeat as necessary. At this time I also follow some healing visualisations, but more about that in a later piece. In what seems like no time the alarm goes on my watch to say I have done 10 minutes.

Affirmations

Then I do Affirmations. No problem choosing affirmations they're all in the separate downloads that you get FREE with the Miracle Morning book. Just combine them all together, and read them out loud, slowly, thinking about them, takes 10 minutes. Change them after you have followed the pattern for a few days. I added some leadership affirmations from Tony Robbins and ‘The Secrets of the Millionaire Mind’ Declarations. Delete those that do not resonate with you. Find a place where this won’t disturb anyone else in your home. Outside in the shed, if you have to. This and the E for exercise are the only parts of this technique that might disturb anyone else. You can also do them later when it suits all concerned.

Visualising

The vision board is simply envisaging in your mind’s eye (but not just seeing - smelling, hearing, feeling, touching as well), all the things that you wish to be, do or have in your life. Mine are below. Make yours up as the mood takes you. I keep it in my mind’s eye, a virtual vision board, if you will, still the same: with pictures, quotes and the whole 9 yards, but not real. I bought all the stuff to make a real one, but it is still stored behind my bedroom door.

My board includes the homes I wish to have, the holidays I am going to take my family on. A vision of how I want to look body wise, the writing I want to complete, the speaking I want to do. I also envisage a couple of my projects being finished successfully. If you get through that before the 10 min alarm goes you start it from the top again. There are a few techniques to help make this section even more relevant and more likely to have positive results. But that is for another time.

Reading

I skip the exercise at this point and go to the Reading. Currently, I am reading a book on writing, one on Habits, and ‘The One Thing’ by Gary Keller. I am a writer.

Scribing

After this reading, I go to my desk and write or journal, exactly as instructed in the Miracle Morning book, under the second S for Scribe, for 10 minutes.

(There is a list of 11 scribing exercises a member of The Miracle Morning FaceBook group has written to assist greatly in this part of SAVERS. I’ll ask his permission to share it here for your reading delight, and scribing assistance).

Exercise

Finally, I do the Exercise. 10 minutes, made up of 3 minutes planking, 4 minutes running on the spot, (I do this while at the same time putting on the coffee and dropping bread into the toaster) and 3 minutes exercise on my gym ball. Then it's time for breakfast. Now 2 or 3 mornings a week I go swimming and Thursday mornings I have yoga, so that forms the E for those days. Nothing else is required.

What does this all mean? I get up an hour before I need to do anything else during the day.

WHY

If this is not working out for you, then the only thing you might be missing is a big WHY. You get up to go to work because you have to. That is your why. The alarm goes off at 7 o'clock so you can do the required stuff and be at work at 9; because you have to. I repeat; that is your why. If you have no why you'll never get up, you will simply press snooze, over and over. You will get fired if you continue to do this. A big WHY right there.

Imagine

Your house is on fire at 3:30 am in the morning. You wake up smelling smoke. You cannot hold your hand up and say, “Snooze this fire, I am not ready to get up”. No! You must immediately bounce out of bed, react to the emergency and do all the necessary things. Wake up other people and animals. Get dressed. Collect important documents. Take whatever else you have time for. No coffee. No easing into it. No excuses such as, ‘I am NOT a morning person’. Just action. Full on. That is a huge WHY right there. And you WILL do it. Guaranteed.

Possibly 24 hours later you might get to sleep in someone else's house.

If you have a WHY that is big enough you won't even need the alarm. If you don't, then this is possibly not the right technique for you. We can talk about WHY later. But in the meanwhile Google and get hold of any book entitled something like, Know your why, or Find or why. They will be very helpful.

Extra Years

I have found, that following the steps in The Miracle Morning book, I am consistently getting up 3 hours before I normally would. Over the next 20 years, this will give me over 2 years extra in my life. At 70 years of age that is magnificent. Thank you Hal Elrod.

BARTERCARD Australia Revokes Voucher Many Months After Service Has Been Provided.

CANI

In the interests of CANI (Constant And Never-ending Improvement) I submit the following for your information.

Bartercard Australia

Many months ago I joined Bartercard Australia in an attempt to rejuvenate my flagging business. A short time later I received a voucher for $100 partially, I thought, to compensate me for a bad experience with a merchant who refused to provide me with an advertised service, and partially as an incentive to new traders.

Voucher

I used this voucher with another new merchant so we both could benefit and I was very happy.

Due to circumstances beyond my control – my finances imploded on a grand scale and I was unable to continue to pay the monthly fee – I found it necessary to resign from the Bartercard organisation.

Even though I had only been a member a short time and they were surprised and disappointed, Bartercard appeared to accept the situation.

Revoked

However, just the other day I received a very short and, I thought terse, letter from Bartercard Australia informing me that the voucher I had used was not going to be honoured and had been returned to the merchant. Now this is approximately 4 months or more after the service had been provided. I was happy with the service and I imagine the merchant was too. And at least as far as I know so was Bartercard.

What is the reason for this?

It appears we (both merchant and customer) are being punished for something. Not sure what. Nor why. Perhaps the merchant knows? I certainly don't

A reason might be nice. And as a parent you are always told to ensure that any punishment fitted the crime, and was close in time to the event being punished so the punishee knew what it was all about.

None of this appears to have happened. Bartercard Australia seems to have just decided it was not going to honour a legally issued voucher which had been swapped for a properly advertised and satisfactorily provided service. Go figure.

Now our honest merchant is out of pocket, and quite probably has no way of contacting me to ask for payment.

If I was less than honest and not of moral standing I'd ignore this, but I am not. When I have the money to pay him, which now as a pensioner is not very likely, I will pay.

But my questions are:

  1. What was wrong?
  2. Who was at fault?
  3. Was this because I was forced to resign?

  4. Why did Bartercard just make this apparently unilateral decision?

  5. Why did it take so long for anything to happen?

  6. Does this mean that any voucher is completely useless?

  7. Why would we bother to use one in future?

  8. What does this say about the whole Bartercard system?

  9. Is a promise from this company just a waste of time?

  10. Is this whole Bartercard voucher deal just a scam?

Feedback

There is no failure – only feedback. So I present this not as a complaint, nor as an indication of failure, but as feedback; an attempt to understand for myself what has happened; to help Bartercard get it right; and to assist others who might use this system and/or these vouchers to figure out that the usually expected outcome may be dependant on circumstances that do not become apparent, if ever, for many months.

Looking for an improvement suggestion, Bartercard? Here is one. Remember CANI.